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How to wire a ceiling rose (loop in method/3x twin and earth cables)
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Wiring a ceiling rose

Please read the disclaimer before attempting any electrical work. If you are uncertain then contact a qualified electrician.

 

Un screw the ceiling rose.
If you have already took the light down and are unsure which cables are which then click the link to the left.

Make a note of the wiring order or even take a picture if it helps. I always look for the brown tape/sleeving to identify the switch wire. If one of your wires in your ceiling rose hasn’t got any tape/sleeving on it then it is a good idea to put some on. If you can’t identify the switch wire it is the wire connected to the brown wire on the ceiling rose.

 

Carefully un screw the terminals and gently slide the cables through the rose making sure u don't damage the cables or remove the tape/sleeving leaving you no identification of the switch wire.

 

Take out the knock out from the new ceiling rose to suite and then re secure to ceiling.

 

 

Check the condition of the cables, it’s always a good idea to re-strip the wires and double over the cables for good practise.

copy your picture/diagram and place neatly in the correct terminals and tighten
(Make sure that the connections are tight and give them a gentle pull to check).

 

 

Screw the ceiling rose back on and make sure there are no gaps.

You may now place your bulb/lamp in the ceiling rose.

More Information

Wiring a ceiling rose may look confusing at first. But the aim of this guide is to help you do so correctly and to make it as easy as possible. The way a ceiling rose works is the power either comes from the consumer unit or the lamp before it (a radial circuit). The power will be sent from one lamp to another via connecting blocks that are connected to the live wire that goes out.


When a light is joined to the ceiling rose it will be wired into the neutral terminal as well as the live terminal that is shown in the ceiling rose. For the rose to work correctly it must be interrupted by the switch.

This is an easy task as a cable (switch wire) will be added. One of the wires that comes from the switch wire will be connected to the live terminal. This will take the live current to the light switch. The earth cable goes straight to earth and should never be used as a live wire. It will then be connected to the switch terminal located in the ceiling rose. This in turn will bring the live current back into the rose to complete the loop.


To break it down we have live current going down to the switch of choice and when the switch gets turned on it will allow the current to pass through the switch and to the ceiling rose which allows the love current to reach the light.

"The most common mistake I have found as a professional electrician is that people who attempt DIY sometimes connect all the black/blue cables and all the red/brown cables together. This can be very dangerous because as you can see from our diagram you are effectively connecting a live to a neutral (which will go with a big bang and trip the fuse)" - Jamie Vernon of Online Electrical Services LTD.

Tips


When choosing a position for a new ceiling rose I always bring the cables out directly next to a joist. If this is not possible then mount a wooden batten between the two nearest joists to provide a secure fixing for the light.

If you are using metal/chrome/brass switches always make sure the switch is earthed.

Check if your lights have earths, if there are no earths in your switches or lights get in touch with a qualified electrician.

Always use insulated tools when working with electricity.

Take your time and double over your single cables as good practice.

 

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